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Hackster.io's Smart Bartender

Added to IoTplaybook or last updated on: 06/04/2019
Smart Bartender

Smart Bartender

Tired of paying $12 for a small drink at the bars? Well be tired no more. You can have your very own personal bartender in your home, and also be the envy of your friends. We built a smart, Raspberry Pi powered bartender that can make drinks by mixing up to 6 ingredients together at the same time, so you can have anything from a rum and coke to a long island iced tea.

The bartender can be customized to make any number of drinks, can be expanded to mix more ingredients, and also has the potential for connectivity with Alexa and Google Home / Google Assistant.

The drinks can be configured on the bartender with two simple buttons and a screen, and you can add any number of drinks to the bartender's repository through the bartender's code.

Check out our video below to see how it works and how we built it:

 

How to Make a Raspberry Pi Smart Bartender

Things used in this project

Hardware components

Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
Raspberry Pi 3 Model B
 
× 1

Buy from Newark

Buy from Adafruit

Buy from ModMiPI

Buy from SparkFun

 
Momentary Push Button Switch
 
× 2

Buy from Amazon

 
PVC Project Board
 
× 2

Buy from Home Depot

 
8 Channel Relay
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
12V Switching Power Supply
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
Power Cable
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
5V Regulator
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
Power Distribution Board
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
Peristaltic Pump
 
× 6

Buy from Amazon

 
Food Grade Silicone Tubing 2mm Inner Diameter
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
LED Strip
 
× 1

Buy from Newark

 
Kitchen Funnel
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
Red Pepper Hat
 
× 3

Buy from Amazon

 
OLED Display
 
× 1

Buy from Newark

1N4007 – High Voltage, High Current Rated Diode
1N4007 – High Voltage, High Current Rated Diode
 
× 6

Buy from Newark

Jumper wires (generic)
Jumper wires (generic)
 
× 1

Buy from Newark

 
3mm Outdoor Mounting Tape
 
× 1

Buy from Amazon

 
Wood Screws
 
× 1  
 
M2.5 Screws
 
× 4  

Hand tools and fabrication machines

 
Hand Drill
 
   
 
Box Cutter
 
   
 
Wood Saw
 
   
Soldering iron (generic)
Soldering iron (generic)

 

Building the Frame

First, we cut the following pieces of 1 by 2 wood:

  • 4x 16" long
  • 4x 9" long
  • 6x 7.5" long

Note that the actual dimensions of 1 by 2s is 0.75" by 1.5".

6x 7.5" long 1 by 2s
6x7.5" 1 by 2s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4x 9" long 1 by 2s
4x9" long 1 by 2s

4x 16" long 1 by 2s
4x16" long 1 by 2s

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screw 2 of the 16" pieces, and two of the 7.5" pieces together to make the side of the bartender frame. Repeat this again to make the other side of the frame.

We first drilled pilot holes into the wood before screwing in the screws because we found this helped prevent the wood from splitting apart.

Drilling one of the sides of the frame to prepare for screws
Drilling one of the sides of the frame to prepare for screws

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We then connected these two sides together using the 9" long pieces, using 2 to connect the bottom, and two to connect the top.

Connecting the sides together using the 9" long wood
Connecting the sides together using the 9" long wood

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The electronics will sit at the bottom of the bartender, but we need a platform above the electronics to hold the drink. That's where the last two pieces of 7.5" wood comes in. We measured 3 inches from the bottom of the frame, and screwed in the 7.5" wood on either side of the bartender above the 3 inch mark.

Screwing in the supports for the drink platform
Screwing in the supports for the drink platform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The final frame
The final frame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutting the Drink and Electronics Platforms

We used two pieces of medium density fiber (MDF) board for two different platforms: one platform that the drink will sit on top of, and one platform where all the electronics will be mounted.

The MDF boards were cut using a jigsaw to the follow dimensions:

  • Drink platform: 12" x 9"
  • Electronics platform: 11-7/8" x 7-3/8"

The drink platform is simply going to sit on top of the ledge we screwed in near the bottom of the frame, in between the four vertical posts of the frame. So we also cut a 1.5" x 0.75" notch out of each corner of the drink platform for those four posts.

Cutting the 12" x 9" drink platform
Cutting the 12" x 9" drink platform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutting notches out of each corner of the drink platform for the vertical posts of the frame
Cutting notches out of each corner of the drink platform for frame posts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cutting the electronics platform
Cutting the electronics platform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The drink platform should wedge nicely inside the bartender frame on top of the side supports. The electronics platform should slide in nicely from the side of the frame and rest on top of the bottom pieces of the frame.

Setting the drink platform into the frame
Setting the drink platform into the frame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sliding in the electronics platform from the side
Sliding in the electronics platform from the side

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Making the Bartender Panels

The wood frame is only the skeleton of the bartender, but it definitely needs some skin. We decided to use some black PVC sheet material that was fairly easy to cut to size with a box cutter to the following dimensions:

  • Front panel: 12" x 16"
  • Left panel: 9.25" x 16"
  • Right panel: 9.25" x 12-1/8"
  • Access panel: 9.25" x 3-7/8"
  • Top panel: 12.25" x 9-5/16"
  • Back panel: 12" x 16"
  • Inside side panels: 8-15/16" x 10.25"

Once the sheets are scored deeply enough with the box cutter, we were able to snap the pieces off, using an extra wood piece to help distribute the load.

Cutting the PVC sheets with a box cutter to create the panels
Cutting the PVC sheets with a box cutter to create the panels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snapping off a piece of PVC sheet scored with a box cutter
Snapping off a piece of PVC sheet scored with a box cutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 7 panels of the bartender
The 7 panels of the bartender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of course, the front panel needs a window in it where the drink will be inserted into the bartender. We cut out a 8.5" wide by 10" tall window in it that started just above where the MDF board is held inside the frame.

We then screwed in the side panels, but left the rest of the frame open to allow us to mount components and electronics in it before we seal it up.

Cutting the window out of the front panel
Cutting the window out of the front panel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screwing in the side panels
Screwing in the side panels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assembling the Funnel

Next we 3D printed a bracket to hold the drink funnel that will channel all the drink ingredients into the glass. Our 3D printer wasn't very big, so we split the bracket into two identical, mirrored parts which we then bonded together. All our 3D printed parts that we used for this project are included in this post for your use.

After it dried, we screwed the bracket into the underside of the top of the bartender frame, and dropped the funnel in, letting it simply rest loosely in the bracket.

The two 3D printed bracket for the drink funnel
The two 3D printed bracket for the drink funnel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Applying Gorilla glue to bond the bracket together
Applying Gorilla glue to bond the bracket together

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonding the bracket together
Bonding the bracket together

Screwing in the bracket to the underside of the top of the frame
Screwing in the bracket to the underside of the top of the frame

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mounting and Wiring the Electronics Board

Next, we mounted the electronics on the the MDF board electronics platform using double-sided outdoor mounting tape. Refer to the circuit diagram to see how to connect everything up. All the parts are linked in the parts list as well.

Circuit diagram
Caption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting the voltage regulator
Connecting the voltage regulator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Connecting the power supply
Connecting the power supply

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The electronics platform (wiring incomplete)
Caption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mounting the Drink Pumps

There is room to add more pumps so that you can make crazier drinks if you'd like, but we attached six pumps to the back of our bartender for up to six different ingredients. Because of the way we wanted to mount our pumps, and the orientation of the tubes coming out of the pumps, we 3D printed some standoffs to allow us to mount the pumps without pinching the tubes against the surface of the bartender. But we first screwed in the back panel, and the pumps were screwed in through this panel and into the vertical wood posts.

Screwing the pumps into the back of the bartender with 3D printed standoffs
Screwing the pumps into the back of the bartender with 3D printed standoffs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screwing in the last pump
Screwing in the last pump

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There will be a lot of wires coming from the pumps into the electronics tray at the bottom of the bartender, so we drilled a couple half inch holes near the electronics; one hole for all the wires going to the pumps, and one hole for the thick power cable that will connect the power supply to the wall outlet.

We also 3D printed a couple bushings to cover up the jagged edges of these holes and to protect the wires and cables.

Drilling two holes for wires and cabling
Drilling two holes for wires and cabling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the LED Lights

Whether it's food or drink, presentation is important, so we added a multi-color LED strip around the top of the frame to add a little bit of flash as the bartender is making a drink. We simply used our trusty outdoor mounting tape to stick it on there, and routed the wires between the outside side panel, and the inside side panel (which we will install later).

Sticking the LED strip around the perimeter of the frame with outdoor mounting tape
Caption

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top of the bartender with funnel bracket and LED strip
Top of the bartender with funnel bracket and LED strip

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Manifold

We 3D printed a manifold that routes the tubes from all six pumps into drink funnel. But first we had to drill six holes in the top panel of the bartender to allow the tubes to feed inside the bartender. So after 3D printing the manifold, we lined it up with the top panel, and traced out where we needed to drill the holes.

Once that was prepared, we made sure that the funnel was installed inside the bracket, and screwed in the top panel over it on top of the frame.

Drilling 6 holes in the top panel to feed the tubes through
Drilling 6 holes in the top panel to feed the tubes through

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The top bartender panel with tube feed-though holes drilled
The top bartender panel with tube feed-though holes drilled

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screwing in the top panel
Screwing in the top panel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We then lined up some of our food-grade silicone tubing from each pump to through the manifold, and into the drink funnel to see how long they needed to be, and then cut them to length. We also cut six additional tubes that were long enough to route from the pumps to each of the ingredient bottles behind the bartender.

Cutting the food-grade silicone tubing to length
Cutting the food-grade silicone tubing to length

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press-fitting the tubes into the pump fittings
Press-fitting the tubes into the pump fittings

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feeding the tubes through the manifold
Feeding the tubes through the manifold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tubes fed through the manifold and into the holes in the top panel
Tubes fed through the manifold and into the holes in the top panel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plumbing from pumps through manifold into the bartender
Plumbing from pumps through manifold into the bartender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Screwing the manifold into the bartender
Screwing the manifold into the bartender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Buttons and Screen

Next we had to install the small screen that will display the drink menu and status and the two buttons to interact with the bartender. So we cut a rectangular hole in the front PVC panel underneath the drink window, and drilled four small holes around this cutout that corresponded to the holes on the board of the screen. The screen was attached to the back of the front panel with 4 small screws.

We also drilled two holes on either side of the screen to mount the buttons used to interact with the bartender. The buttons simply slipped into the holes and were fastened down from the back side of the panel with a hex nut.

Installing the screen and buttons
Installing the screen and buttons

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To make things look a little nicer, we also 3D printed a border to place around the screen that we bonded onto the front panel with some glue.

Applying glue to the screen border
Applying glue to the screen border

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See the circuit diagram for how to wire up the screen and pumps.

Wiring the Pumps

Next we soldered black and red power wires to the two terminals on each pump. To prevent any residue current from flowing back into the Raspberry Pi, we also soldered a 1N007 diode across the terminals on each pump, as shown the the circuit diagram.

Soldering wires to each of the pump terminals
Soldering wires to each of the pump terminals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To prevent the back from looking too messy with all the wires, we tried to nicely bundle and route the wires together using some electrical tape. You can also see the two 3D printed bushings at the bottom of the bartender in the picture below.

Wires for the pump and power cable to the wall outlet
Wires for the pump and power cable to the wall outlet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Installing the Cupholder

Although this part wasn't necessary, it sure made our bartender look nicer, and also made it easier to know where to position a glass when making a drink. 3D printable files are included with this post for this cupholder with and without our logo.

The cupholder had three stubs on the bottom side which press-fit into corresponding holes that we drilled into the drink platform.

Hacker Shack cupholder
Hacker Shack cupholder

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measuring the 3 cupholder mounting hole positions using a protractor
Measuring the 3 cupholder mounting hole positions using a protractor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Drilling the cupholder mounting holes into the drink platform
Drilling the cupholder mounting holes into the drink platform

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Press-fitting the cupholder into the drink platform holes
Press-fitting the cupholder into the drink platform holes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Software

You're almost there! That's all for setting up the physical bartender and hardware. Now visit our Github page for details on how to set up the software in your Raspberry Pi to run the bartender.

Code on GitHub
Code on GitHub

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Done!

Congratulations if you've made it this far! Now you can be the envy of your guests. But the great thing about this bartender is that it's also quite portable, so you can use it anywhere that you can find a wall outlet. If you haven't already, you can watch the video to see how you can use the buttons to navigate through the menus on the bartender screen.

Aaron making a margarita on Cinco de Mayo
Aaron making a margarita on Cinco de Mayo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Note on Cleaning

After you use the bartender, you'll want to flush out the pump tubes in order to avoid bacteria growth. There is an easy way to do this in the configuration menu. Hook all the tubes up to a water source, then navigate to configure->clean on the bartender screen and press the select button. All pumps will turn on to flush the existing liquid from the tubes. I take the tubes out of the water source halfway through to pump some air through the tubes and remove all water from the pumps. Note: make sure you have a glass under the funnel to catch the flushed out liquid.

Sanitation recommendations per FDA is 1 Tbsp bleach in 1 gallon water with a contact time of 2 minutes, then rinse thoroughly for the same time (recommended weekly).

Cheers,

Davis @ Hacker Shack

Custom parts and enclosures

manifold_PcHoeL3HfP

3D Model on Sketchfab

Drink Manifold

This manifold can be used to route the tubes from the drink pumps to the funnel.

Funnel Holder - Half

Print two of these and bond them together to create the holder for the drink funnel. Sketchfab

Cupholder

A cupholder to place in the center of the bartender platform to set your glass on. Sketchfab.

Cupholder, No Logo

A cupholder to place in the center of the bartender platform to set your glass on. Sketchfab.

Cupholder Stub

Stubs to glue onto the bottom of the cupholder for attachment to the platform. Sketchfab.

Pump Standoff

Use this standoff to attach the pumps onto the back of the bartender while raising it off the surface of the bartender to allow the tubes to bend out of the way. Sketchfab.

Wire Bushing

Bushings to put into the cable feed-through holes on the back of the bartender to cover up the opening better. Sketchfab.

Screen Border

A border for the OLED screen to frame the screen nicely. Sketchfab.

Schematics

Sketch bb tpxhgj25r5
Sketch bb tpxhgj25r5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fritzing

Fzz file.

Code

HackerShackOfficial / Smart-Bartender

ReadMe file

Credits

Hacker Shack

Hacker Shack

5 projects • 361 followers

Hacker Shack is a team of two engineers that make instructional DIY videos about robotics, software, and other cool tech related projects.

 

Hackster.io

This content is provided by our content partner Hackster.io, an Avnet developer community for learning, programming, and building hardware. Visit them online for more great content like this.

This article was originally published at Hackster.io. It was added to IoTplaybook or last modified on 06/04/2019.